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The Afterlife

Levels in heaven Agree: 4 divider Disagree: 0

143

Both Agreements and DisagreementsThe concept of levels in heaven is useful for human understanding of the spirit world, but is not meaningful when one actually is in heaven. Spirits have different vibration levels of their energy which is transformed into light. Spiritual evolution occurs when a spirit moves into more of that oneness and more of that connectiveness to the Creator, influenced strongly by lessons successfully learned on earth.

AgreeFamiliar beings are clustered together in undulating masses of bright light.

Journey of Souls: Case Studies of Life Between Lives, Michael Newton
pg. 85, 1996

AgreeOnce our souls advance past Level II into the intermediate ranges of development, group cluster activity is considerably reduced. This does not mean we return to the kind of isolation we saw with the novice soul. Souls evolving into the middle development levels have less association with primary groups because they have acquired the maturity and experience for operating more independently. These souls are also reducing the number of their incarnations.

Journey of Souls: Case Studies of Life Between Lives, Michael Newton
pg. 143, 1996

AgreeOne very meaningful aspect of my research has been the discovery of energy colors displayed by souls in the spirit world. These colors relate to a soul's state of advancement....I found that typically, pure white denotes a younger soul and with advancement soul energy becomes more dense, moving into orange, yellow, green and finally the blue ranges.

Destiny of Souls, Michael Newton
pg. 5, 2003

AgreeI see the soul as intelligent light energy. This energy appears to function as vibrational waves similar to electromagnetic force but without the limitations of charged particles of matter.

Destiny of Souls, Michael Newton
pg. 85, 2003

Afterlife101.com Source

Millions long for immortality who do not know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon.

—Susan Ertz, Anger in the Sky